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National Moldy Cheese Day

Posted by on Oct 9, 2016 in Food, Food Blog, France, Italy, Latest Book News, National Food Holidays, National Moldy Cheese Day, Road Trips R Us, Roadtrips R Us, Roadtripsrus, RoadtripsRUs.net, The Long Road Home by Author Carolyn M. Bowen, Today in Food History, Top 5 Stinky Cheeses in the World, Travel, Travel Blog, Uncategorized | Comments Off on National Moldy Cheese Day

Quote for Today: “To me, life without veal stock, pork fat, sausage, organ meat, demi-glace, or even stinky cheese is a life not worth living.” Anthony Bourdain National Moldy Cheese Day Today October 9th is National Moldy Cheese Day. I happen to love both repulsive smelling cheese and the variety of items stuffed into a long roll. There are over 2,000 varieties of cheeses in the world. Here’s my pick of the top five stinkiest kinds of cheese in the world. Top 5 Stinky Cheeses in the World 1) Epoisses: France – Across the pond, they make it raw and unpasteurized. It’s nutty, salty, creamy and yes very stinky. It was also a favorite of Napoleon’s. 2) Taleggio: Italy – This cheese has been around since the 10th Century. It’s really smelly when melted and goes great with fruit...

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What? Not Blue Cheese Day!

Posted by on Jul 27, 2013 in Bleu des Causses, France, Roadtrips R Us, Stilton and Sage recipe, Stilton Cheese | Comments Off on What? Not Blue Cheese Day!

Quote for Today: How can anyone govern a nation that has two hundred and forty-six different kinds of cheese? Charles de Gaulle I was getting kind of excited about naming today National Blue Cheese Day. Luckily, I did a little research and found out I had missed the real Blue Cheese Day by almost two months. I have no idea who proclaimed June 4th National Blue Cheese Day, but I can not believe that I didn’t know it existed. What prompted me to write this is that on this day in 1925 Roquefort became the first cheese to have a protected designation of origin. For a cheese to be named Roquefort it must be made from the milk of a certain breed of sheep then matured in caves near the town of Roquefort-Sur-Soulzon, France. This white tangy cheese has...

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Where’s the Beef? Chateaubriand Steak

Posted by on Jul 4, 2013 in Chateaubriand, Chateaubriand Steak, Chef TJ's Recipe, Cooking, Easy Recipes by Chef TJ, Food, Food & Travel Blog, Food Blog, Food History, France, Francois-Rene de Chateaubriand, Great Chef's, History Today, Recipes, Roadtrips R Us, Today in Food History, Travel & Food Blog, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Where’s the Beef? Chateaubriand Steak

Quote for Today:  Waiter:   How would you like your steaks cooked?  Pepper:  Oh, just knock its horns off, wipe its nasty ass, and chunk it right here on this plate.  Woody Harrelson “The Cowboy Way” (1994)   Today in Food History… On September 4th, 1768 Francois-Rene de Chateaubriand was born.  Living in a very volatile time in the history of France, especially for an aristocrat, Francois-Rene had his share of ups and downs including two terms of exile, one in America which inspired his first writings and the other in England living in extreme poverty.  As a young man he was torn between the military and becoming a priest.  How ironic it is that he became the founder of romanticism in French literature. During one of his prosperous periods his household Chef Montmireil created a beef dish in his honor.  Even though it is not a mainstay on...

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Dîner des trois empereurs – Chef Adolphe Dugléré

Posted by on Jun 3, 2013 in Chef Adolphe Duglere, Dinner of Three Emperors, Famous Chefs, Food, Food and Travel Blog, Food Blog, Food History, France, Great Chef's, Palais-Royale, Paris, Roadtrips R Us, Today in Food History, Travel & Food Blog, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Dîner des trois empereurs – Chef Adolphe Dugléré

Quote for Today:  To me, life without veal stock, pork fat, sausage, organ meat, demi-glace, or even stinky cheese is a life not worth living.  Anthony Bourdain The great Chef Adolphe Dugléré was a pupil of famous French Chef Marie-Antonin Carême.  Adolphe was born in Bordeaux in 1805 and died in Paris in 1884. Along the way, he had an impressive career.  After his apprenticeship Adolphe became Chef de cuisine for the famous Rothschild Family until 1848.  For the next eighteen years, he managed the restaurant of the Palais-Royale which is owned by three prominent men from Provence.  In 1866 he became the head chef of the Café Anglais which was the most famous Paris restaurant of the 19th century where he created one of his most famous dishes Pommes Anna. On this day in history 1867, Dugléré served a famous meal which became known as the Dinner of the Three Emperors.  In attendance...

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A fish stew, from me to you.

Posted by on Dec 20, 2012 in California, Food, Food Blog, Food Holiday, France, Marseille France, Panhandle Fish Stew Recipe, Roadtrips R Us, Today in Food History, Travel, Travel & Food Blog, Travel Blog | Comments Off on A fish stew, from me to you.

Quote for Today: “Bouillabaisse is only good because cooked by the French, who, if they cared to try, could produce an excellent and nutritious substitute out of cigar stumps and empty matchboxes.”  Norman Douglas, British novelist (1868-1952) Today is National Bouillabaisse Day. I honestly have never been to a restaurant that offered this classic provencal fish stew from the port city of Marseille. While in California, I had the good fortune to eat Cioppino at a couple of great restaurants that sold dozens and dozens of them everyday.  The only problem that occurs is when you can not find a place that highlights their menu with a great fish stew. Odds are you are then better off making it at home. The recipe I am giving you is just a guideline. In no way shape or form is this a traditional...

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Julia Child – 6′ 2″ Queen of the Kitchen

Posted by on Aug 15, 2012 in Coq au Vin food recipe, Food & Travel Blog, Food Blog, Food History, France, Julia Child, Louisetta Berthalle, Quotes, Road Trips R Us, Roadtrips R Us, Roadtripsrus, RoadtripsRUs.net, Today in Food History, Today in History, Travel Blog, Twitter | Comments Off on Julia Child – 6′ 2″ Queen of the Kitchen

Quote for Today: Non-cooks think it’s silly to invest two hour’s work in two minutes’ enjoyment, but if cooking is evanescent, well, so is the ballet.  Julia Child Today we celebrate the 100th birthday of America’s Grande Dame of cooking, Julia Child.  The popular television chef and author was born Julia McWilliams in Pasadena, California to John McWilliams Jr. a Princeton graduate and investor in California  real estate and his wife, the former Julia Carolyn Weston, a paper company heiress whose father served as Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts. In 1930 she enrolled at Smith College in Massachusetts with the intention of becoming a writer.  At the onset of World War II, Julia moved to Washington, D.C. where she volunteered as a research assistant for the Office of Strategic Services, a newly formed government intelligence agency.  Here she was given...

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