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International Hot and Spicy Food Day

Posted by on Jan 17, 2017 in Food, Food & Travel Blog, International Hot and Spicy Food Day, International Hot and Spicy Food Day: Top 5 Spots to Celebrate, Roadtrips R Us, RoadtripsRUs.net, Today's Food Holiday, Top 5 Spots to celebrate Hot and Spicy Food Day, Travel, Travel Blog, Uncategorized | Comments Off on International Hot and Spicy Food Day

Quote for Today: Always add a little spicy heat to your dishes. TJ International Hot and Spicy Food Day: Top 5 Spots to Celebrate Today’s Food Holiday  is International Hot and Spicy Food Day. CJ and I love “flavorful” foods which means that we like foods that make us sweat. Flavorful is very good, but loads of Scoville units tickle my fancy. Below is a list of my five favorite foods and the Top 5 Spots for Hot & Spicy Food. They may not contain 16 million of the aforementioned units that burn your mouth, but they taste great. 5) Crawfish – Boiled in Cajun Seasoning with new potatoes, Corn on the Cob and Chaurice Sausage. If done well, the heat in your mouth makes you want more. If you are in Louisiana, try the The Boiling Point in Sulphur, Louisiana from...

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Food Holiday: National Eat A Hoagie Day

Posted by on Sep 15, 2016 in Food, Food Blog, Food Holidays, National Eat A Hoagie Day, Road Trips R Us, Roadtrips R Us, Today's Food Holiday, Travel, Travel & Food Blog | 0 comments

Quote for Today: Too few people understand a really good sandwich. James Beard Today’s Food Holiday is National “Eat a Hoagie Day.” The name hoagie for a sandwich has its roots in Philadelphia. Elsewhere in the United States, pretty much the same size sandwich with various types of bread and fillings have many different names. How the name “hoagie” got attached to a sandwich in Philadelphia has multiple versions. One story claims that Italians working at the World I shipyard in Philadelphia, known as “Hog’s Island,” introduced the sandwich by putting various meats, cheeses, and lettuce between two slices of bread. In different parts of the City other names for this sandwich included the Hoggie, Hog Island, Hokie, Hogan, Honkie, Hoogie, and Hooky. However by 1955, restaurants throughout the district were using the term “Hoagie” with many of them...

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National Scrapple Day 2014: Food Holiday

Posted by on Nov 10, 2014 in Food, Food Blog, Food Holiday, National Scrapple Day 2014, Road Trips R Us, Roadtrips R Us, Today in Food History, Today's Food Holiday, Travel | 0 comments

Thought for Today: “To me, life without veal stock, pork fat, sausage, organ meat, demi-glace, or even stinky cheese is a life not worth living.” Anthony Bourdain Today is National Scrapple Day 2014. Scrapple to me was a regional version of every other “Pâté” in the world. The only thing was I believed it came from the Deep South. I have been wrong before and lo and behold here I am again. Although sold throughout the South in regional areas, Scrapple is best known in Pennsylvania, Maryland, New Jersey and Delaware.  Scrapple is usually comprised of Hog Offal. Most people think of Offal as awful, but when prepared correctly a culinary delight may be found. The trimmings of a hog, which would normally be discarded, including bone, heart and liver are turned into a broth. Once the broth is...

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National Peach Ice Cream Day

Posted by on Jul 18, 2014 in Food, Food Blog, National Peach Ice Cream Day, Road Trips R Us, Roadtrips R Us, Today in Food History, Today's Food Holiday, Travel, Travel & Food Blog, Travel Blog | 0 comments

Quote for Today: The ripest peach is highest on the tree. James Whitcomb Riley Today is National Peach Ice Cream Day which in my opinion is the best way to highlight the wonderful flavor of this Summer time fruit. Being from Georgia, I am used to having a surplus of peaches this time of year and freezing them with eggs, cream, sugar and vanilla is a great way to enjoy them a little longer. I hate to admit it but some of the best peaches I have ever eaten have come from South Carolina and oddly enough South Carolina actually produces more peaches. Georgia must have some kind of patent on that name and won’t let it go. If you are lucky enough to get your hands on a bag full of this fuzzy fruit, here is an easy...

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National Corn Fritter Day

Posted by on Jul 16, 2014 in Dwight D. Eisenhower Quote, Food, Food Blog, Peter Pan Inn Baltimore, Peter Pan Inn Corn Fritter Recipe, Road Trips R Us, Roadtrips R Us, Today in Food History, Today's Food Holiday, Travel | 0 comments

Thought for Today:  “You know, farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you’re a thousand miles from the corn field.” Dwight D. Eisenhower, Address at Bradley University, Peoria, Illinois, 9/25/56 Today is National Corn Fritter Day. These delicious fried morsels are quintessentially Southern and served up as a savory snack or appetizer. A basic fritter batter consists of corn kernels, egg, flour and milk. Anyway, this is what I thought Corn Fritters were. As the Corn Fritter spread across the U.S. it begin to mature into a favorite at restaurants across the Country. Here are a few places to sample some of the best Corn Fritters around followed by an easy recipe to try at home from the former Peter Pan Inn of Baltimore. A. E&O Asian Kitchen: San Francisco, CA – Indonesian Corn Fritters with a...

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National French Fry Day 2014

Posted by on Jul 14, 2014 in Boise Fry Company, Food, Food & Travel Blog, Food Blog, Frjtz Fries in San Francisco, McDonald's History, McDonalds, National French Fry Day, Road Trips R Us, Roadtrips R Us, Roadtripsrus, Today in Food History, Today's Food Holiday, Travel, Travel Blog | 0 comments

Quote for Today:  “It’s finally happened; scientists claim to have discovered the very first person in history who doesn’t like french fries.   Just imagine the implications!”   Graham Parke Today is National French Fry Day.  Although they were originally from Belgium, fries are about as American as any food can be.  They are deep-fried, a great vehicle for ketchup and are made from one of Americas most abundant crops, potatoes. Although French fries have been around since the early 1800’s, they weren’t that popular until after WWI.  American G.I.’s brought back a craving for the fried potatoes they had in Belgium and France. The problem was that it was not practical to cook them at home. Restaurants however had the facilities and equipment to produce French fries, but they couldn’t make it work.  Fries were inconsistent, either soggy, undercooked, overcooked, or...

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